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Aggregated enterprise architecture wisdom

older | 1 | .... | 3 | 4 | (Page 5)

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    By DevOps Digest AGILE ARCHITECTURE The key to achieving business agility – not simply success with Agile approaches – is Agile Architecture: a reinvention of enterprise […]

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    By Shane Hastie ForbesのJason Bloomberg氏は、イベントの内容を要約した“Digital Transformation Requires Enterprisewide Agile Transformation”という記事の中で、イベントについて次のように述べている。 先週ニューヨークで開催された ICAgileの第1回Business Agility 2017カンファレンスにおいて明らかになったのは、アジャイルがテクノロジの枠を飛び越えて、ソフトウェアの世界の外へと拡大したということです。企業は今、アジャイルプラクティスの採用範囲を組織全体へと拡げることで、自らを飲み込もうと荒れ狂う海域の航海を成功に導こうとしているのです。 Read the entire article at https://www.infoq.com/jp/news/2017/04/business-agility2017-success

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    In "Architecture is Dying – Why EA and Agile isn’t enough to stop Shadow IT", Barry O'Reilly writes for IASA, "an association for all IT architects", that "architecture is dying"... Barry expects though a backlash for saying this "horr...

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    continuing from Enterprise Architecture and Agile do muddy the waters of Digital Transformation   In "Architecture is Dying – Why EA and Agile isn’t enough to stop Shadow IT

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    In "Architecture is Dying – Why EA and Agile isn’t enough to stop Shadow IT", Barry O'Reilly writes for IASA, "an association for all IT architects", that "architecture is dying"...   continuing from

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  • 11/03/15--14:32: The Customer Card
  • It’s never been as important to reach outside of the business as it is in the digital world of today. From an architects perspective it is vital to be able to connect the dots between what is servicing and who is being served. This little card is designed to help you go fast by staying small and […]

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    Don’t be scared, level zero in a capability map is just a way to structure the map so that we have a consistent way of communicating. It’s really not that important if all you wish todo is create an excellent set of capabilities for your business. However if you are intent on changing the foundation […]

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  • 11/11/15--02:40: The Digital Business
  • The current situation There is a huge gap in insight as to what a digital business really is. Today when I hear business leders talk about going digital it’s mainly revolving around four scenarios. The first scenario is to connect all the systems together though some sort of integration. The second scenario is to reach […]

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  • 11/20/15--21:14: Bimodal, Agile and DevOps
  • ...never mind IT, to survive, most our enterprises are rather bimodal. But I would no call them that, Bimodal enterprises, it sounds too clinical.

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  • 11/27/15--02:32: To be or not to be Bimodal
  • IT is not really about investigating the emerging Digital technologies landscape, their adoption strategy and roadmapping.

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  • 02/03/16--06:37: The UNIX® Based Cloud
  • By Harry Foxwell, PhD, Principal Consultant, Oracle® Oracle® Solaris continues to evolve as the foundation for critical private cloud implementations.  As the premier UNIX®  system in the IT industry, certified against The Open Group exacting standards for enterprise-level operating systems, … Continue reading

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    I’ve been spending nearly half my time in Philadelphia over the past while, and I just happened to have a spare Saturday yesterday, so I hightailed it downtown. I had two objectives – to explore the Museum of Art and to attend a Brahms concert by the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. One of the featured exhibitions in the adjacent Perelman Building caught my eye. It’s named, Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design. I wasn’t sure what to expect; I certainly hadn’t heard of Bruce Mau before, but I am always interested in design and design methods.

    The gallery is essentially laid out to be controversial, to challenge one’s status quo thinking. In a video, Mau says, “practically everything that we do is being designed or redesigned; if you think about the way that we live now our life from womb to tomb is a design experience. If we want a great life experience you have to design it.” Mau goes on to say his work is focused on allowing people who aren’t designers to have access to the power of design, in their life, their work, in their business. Giving people the tools to design their future in a highly positive way.

    Almost at the door of the gallery is a huge exhibit detailing his “incomplete manifesto for growth”. And the manifesto principles look like a superset of the Agile development manifesto, but writ large, with vastly greater ambition. First there are 43 principles. What! I say to myself, how can that many principles be useful? But of course once you start reading you are hooked. The Agile principles are embedded, but there’s much more. Let me give you a taster:

    1. Allow events to change you. You have to  be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it.

    5. Go deep. The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value.

    8. Drift. Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.

    9. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.

    13. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.

    16. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.

    20. Be careful to take risks. Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.

    22. Make your own tools. Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference.

    29. Think with your mind. Forget technology. Creativity is not device–dependent.

    31. Don’t borrow money. Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.

    39. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms. Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces—what Dr. Seuss calls “the waiting place.”

    41. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.

    These are just a sample. You get the idea. This is Agile for the real world. For those people that are stuck in the zone of religious adherence to Agile development methods this may be anathema. But it’s a wakeup call. Invent your own.

    The complete list and much more . . .

    Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design
    November 21, 2015 - April 3, 2016

    AFTERWORD: I wonder to what extent these principles map to a variety of design disciplines? In fact surely all design disciplines are creative processes. Would this include musical composition? I see no reason why not.

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    I’ve been spending nearly half my time in Philadelphia over the past while, and I just happened to have a spare Saturday yesterday, so I hightailed it downtown. I had two objectives – to explore the Museum of Art and to attend a Brahms concert by the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. One of the featured exhibitions in the adjacent Perelman Building caught my eye. It’s named, Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design. I wasn’t sure what to expect; I certainly hadn’t heard of Bruce Mau before, but I am always interested in design and design methods.

    The gallery is essentially laid out to be controversial, to challenge one’s status quo thinking. In a video, Mau says, “practically everything that we do is being designed or redesigned; if you think about the way that we live now our life from womb to tomb is a design experience. If we want a great life experience you have to design it.” Mau goes on to say his work is focused on allowing people who aren’t designers to have access to the power of design, in their life, their work, in their business. Giving people the tools to design their future in a highly positive way.

    Almost at the door of the gallery is a huge exhibit detailing his “incomplete manifesto for growth”. And the manifesto principles look like a superset of the Agile development manifesto, but writ large, with vastly greater ambition. First there are 43 principles. What! I say to myself, how can that many principles be useful? But of course once you start reading you are hooked. The Agile principles are embedded, but there’s much more. Let me give you a taster:

    1. Allow events to change you. You have to  be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it.

    5. Go deep. The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value.

    8. Drift. Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.

    9. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.

    13. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.

    16. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.

    20. Be careful to take risks. Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.

    22. Make your own tools. Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference.

    29. Think with your mind. Forget technology. Creativity is not device–dependent.

    31. Don’t borrow money. Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.

    39. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms. Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces—what Dr. Seuss calls “the waiting place.”

    41. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.

    These are just a sample. You get the idea. This is Agile for the real world. For those people that are stuck in the zone of religious adherence to Agile development methods this may be anathema. But it’s a wakeup call. Invent your own.

    The complete list and much more . . .

    Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design
    November 21, 2015 - April 3, 2016

    AFTERWORD: I wonder to what extent these principles map to a variety of design disciplines? In fact surely all design disciplines are creative processes. Would this include musical composition? I see no reason why not.

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    Every day I hear more about the pressure I&O organizations are under to accelerate the delivery of applications and services and the pressure it is placing on the existing resources.  As organizations transition, DevOps, formally the purview of unicorns, is now transitioning to mainstream.  DevOps, which started as a grassroots approach by development organizations who […]

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    The key to scaling a software engineering organization is stable teams. A while ago I wrote about the need to focus on stable, autonomous teams. Teams with members that trust each other and thereby become more than the sum of their parts. That is, in the end, the ultimate dream of a software development manager: to create cross-functional, self-organizing, high-performance teams. Teams self-organize around a compelling mission and have a.

    The post The case for strong leadership in agile teams appeared first on The Enterprise Architect.


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    Digital disruptors and customer-obsessed organizations are improving customer experience (CX) by shortening their software delivery cycles, delivering features in smaller increments, and scaling their existing Agile processes with DevOps. Traditional testing services don’t cut it for these organisations. In fact in my recent Continuous Testing Services Providers, Q3 2017 wave research, 38 business leaders representing the top […]

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    I am seeing more and more inquiries focused on driving business transformation where the transformation depends on software and business technology.  ING is a model for digital transformation, and Ralph Hamers, CEO, has publicly reinforced the bank’s transformation. Hamers stated “We have to recognize that technology is what Banks do”[i]. Every business today must focus […]

older | 1 | .... | 3 | 4 | (Page 5)